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Herbs that Grow in Shade

Feverfew for a medicinal herb shade garden

There are many great herbs that grow in shade

In fact, there are certain herbs that bolt if the weather gets too hot and prefer cooler weather. Some of these herbs are for culinary uses in your kitchen, other are medicinal herbs. Growing herbs in a shady spot close to your kitchen is perfect for fresh handfuls of herbs. Herbs can be grown in pots and containers, or in the ground.

Shade herbs still need 3 hours of sunlight a day

Kitchen herb garden grown in the shade

Many of these herbs are pretty after they flower too

Below is flowering cilantro which also helps to attract beneficial bugs. You can also save the seeds as coriander spice once they’ve dried.

Flowering cilantro herbs makes coriander seeds

Flowering chives, another great shade herb

Chives make a pretty flowering herb

Shade tea garden

Make chamomile or mint tea with your shade herbs

Chamomile Herbs that grow in the shade

Flowering dill helps to attract beneficial bugs

Flowering dill helps to attract beneficial bugs

Borage flowers

These flowers are an edible herb flower that taste like cucumber (see recipes).

Borage flowers are great for the shade herb garden and are edible too

Great herbs to grow in shade:

  • Cilantro/Coriander
  • Mints like peppermint, spearmint, chocolate mint
  • Chamomile
  • Parsley
  • Lemon Balm
  • Dill
  • Beebalms
  • Catnip
  • Feverfew
  • Chives
  • Borage
  • Licorice Mint
  • Angelica

Flowering mint in the shade herb garden

Have you grown herbs that grow in shade before?

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Many of the links to products on this site are affiliate links. These are products that I've used or recommend based from homesteading experience. I do make a small commission (at no extra cost to you) from these sales.Family Food Garden is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com