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Spring Vegetables & Fruits that are In Season

Spring is an amazing time, especially if you live in a northern climate

Spring eating is lighter after long winters of craving heavier meals. Wild spring greens tend to be bitter, as are many homegrown greens or ones available at the farmers market. Bitter greens are full of vitamins and help in digestion.

One thing to note for seasonal spring eating is a trend of lighter eating: baby salad leaves, bitter greens, fresh herbs & certain fruit

This post will show you what spring vegetables and spring fruits are in season

Spring vegetables to eat in season

 First of all, what spring vegetables or fruit are in season greatly depends on your climate.

If you live in zone 3, spring might not arrive until May. If you are lucky and live in a zone 8 then your spring is much sooner. The first ‘day’ of spring is in March, but some have snow then and some are able to purchase foods that are in season already. I live in zone 5, somewhat in the middle of these two.

There are different ways to get spring veggies

  • Eating veggies that were directly sown in the springtime from your garden or farmers market
  • Harvesting perennials and offer early harvests
  • Using spring season extenders like hoop tunnels or cold frames to get extra early harvests. We’re thankful we grow food year-round in a greenhouse
  • Overwintering veggies for late winter and early spring harvests
  • Foraging for wild edibles like dandelions, nettles, wild leeks & more

Spring vegetables and fruits that are in season for seasonal eating

List of veggies that are in season during the spring

Overwintered veggies:  Parsnips, arugula, spinach, mache, overwintered greens (learn how to grow greens year-round with my 60 page guide), even forgotten about baby potatoes!

Early Spring Gardening with Season Extenders: Arugula, spinach, mache, mustards, baby greens, radishes.

Seasonal spring vegetables

Spring fruits

  • Strawberries
  • Rhubarb
  • Cherries

What vegetables are in season in the spring?

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Many of the links to products on this site are affiliate links. These are products that I've used or recommend based from homesteading experience. I do make a small commission (at no extra cost to you) from these sales.Family Food Garden is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com